My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy: + Clean restroom, always clean. Yes, we notice these things. + Lots of goodies for customers. Who doesn't like candy? + Staff is always super nice and friendly! + Stacy, the owner, is probably one of the nicest, most sincere people I've ever met. + Most important: There is a "husband chair." Suggestions: * Wi-Fi. Husbands like Wi-Fi. (A PlayStation wouldn't hurt either...) Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.
Please do NOT purchase anything online or order in the store or you may wait over 3 months like me to receive your PAID product!!! A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10. The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items. I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs. A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product. She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address. I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !! I filled out a complaint online to the Better Business Bureau. I received a confirmation email from BBB stating she has until January 17, 2014 to respond to this complaint. I read Several complaints on her facebook page about the poor or lack of customer service on prepaid orders, especially online orders never being fulfilled, customers never being contacted on their orders. Stacey's response to one lady was "We are a small Mom and Pop shop...." WOW ! Really! I think it's ridiculous that she continues to have Big sales events, free make and takes every weekend, and people are prepaying for orders either in her store or online and yet we all sit here and wait for our PREPAID merchandise !!! Doesn't matter if a store is big or small...Customer's shouldn't have to wait over 3 months to receive something they already paid for and not one person from her store contact the customer!!!
Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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