This store is also a true "Mom and Pop" store that has been run by Tracey and her parents. Many of you have come to know and love this family. You were their when Tracey and her family welcomed Tracey's daughter Amber into their lives and when Tracey lost her belove...d dad. They have had up's, downs and a whole lotta hanging in their trying to keep their doors open. And, like I said, many of you So. Cal Peep's have become family to this store.

Page trimmers allow you to cut paper cleanly and precisely. Use a page trimmer when you need to cut cardstock, patterned paper, or pictures to fit neatly into your album. You can save time by stacking multiple pages in your trimmer and cutting them simultaneously. For smaller cutting tasks, use a sturdy pair of scissors. Long-bladed scissors are helpful for quick cutting jobs that require flexibility, such as cutting out letters or tricky shapes. Scissors are also handy for cutting scrapbook embellishments like ribbons and stamps.

Next, simply replace each template on your layout with the completed paper element. It is hard to describe the sense of satisfaction that comes as you watch your design spring to life before your eyes! And the best part is that it will look exactly like you thought it would every time, if not better! The end result will be an inexpensive, beautiful layout that will bring an added sense of creative fulfillment to your day!
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
Furthermore, digital scrapbooking is not limited to digital storage and display. Many digital scrappers print their finished layouts to be stored in scrapbook albums. Others have books professionally printed in hard bound books to be saved as keepsakes. Professional printing- and binding-services offer free software to create scrapbooks with professional layouts and individual layout capabilities. Because of the integrated design and order workflow, real hardcover bound books can be produced more cost effectively.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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