Hello Everyone!!! Here it is...that Saturday with Stacey Class that gives you one place to learn MORE about the Go, Press and Foil machine by Couture Creations! In this "Do's and Don'ts" class we start with the basics of foiling but then we take it up a notch and we get wahoooo kachoooo with Cut 'n Foil Plates and then WOWZERS, we show you how to REALLY GET THE MOST our of your Go, Press and Foil Machine!!! So, hit the play button and lets get started!
For anyone still a little intimidated by the scrapbooking craze, Scrapbooking Made Easy is the best place to start. At its core is the notion that even the simplest pages will make for treausred family heirlooms. From that, it's only a matter of applying the basic techniques in a step-by-step process, starting with quick ways to enhance layouts, and gradually moving on to ...more

Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.

For example, for a page of black and white photos, an elegant paper is usually the most suitable paper print. After you have selected a themed paper, you can then go ahead and select a cardstock matt or a coordinating plain paper to frame or mat the photos. It’s important to note that if you have selected the double paged spread, then you can either decide to use two background papers that match or you can select two papers that coordinate.


Whatever theme you've chosen for your scrapbook, you'll need a few essentials to get started. First, you'll need an album and its basic contents: cardstock, patterned paper and page protectors. Next, you need a selection of tools and supplies, including pencils, coloured markers, adhesives, a ruler and a page trimmer. Embellishments are an exciting part of scrapbooking. Your choice of ribbons, glitter or 3D stickers will inject your personality into your scrapbook and make the individual pages stand out. Staying organized is essential: a basic storage system will help keep your mind and workspace tidy so you can focus on being creative and having fun. 
Just like old memories, scrapbook pages often benefit from a few embellishments. There's endless array of arts and crafts decorations available to add spice and pizazz to your journaling. Your options include ribbons, glitter, 3D stickers, and self-adhesive chipboard pieces featuring words or phrases relevant to your theme. In keeping with your personal style and the type of scrapbook you're creating, you can mix and match multiple embellishments to add flair to your story and make your pages pop.

Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!
For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
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