Welcome to Paper Wishes® Scrapbooking 101 – your guide to the basics of scrapbooking! Whether you are brand new to scrapbooking, or are just looking to master the basics, Scrapbooking 101 has all the information you need to get started creating your own scrapbook pages and albums! Scrapbooking 101 provides information about commonly used scrapbooking supplies, including adhesives and paper cutting tools. Scrapbooking 101 also has articles covering scrapbooking ideas and layouts, including general tips on how to use and combine your scrapbooking papers! When you are ready to move beyond the basics, delve into our Scrapbooking Articles section to learn convenient shortcuts and new techniques that will enhance your scrapbook pages, such as embellishments, stamping and journaling. Also be sure to try some of the great scrapbooking ideas found in our Project of the Month section. The scrapbook albums you create will be treasured keepsakes for years to come!
Waterproof and fade-proof pens for journaling will keep your scrapbook timeless. Pencils are handy for sketching out custom fonts or for marking borders when you may need to erase your work. Try adding your own comments or doodles with coloured pens ranging from fat to skinny tip. If you can’t decide which colour will match with your theme, a classic black ink pen is always a good choice. Handwritten notes detailing facts like dates, locations, and moods are an easy way to personalize your journal and make your entries more memorable and meaningful. 
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.
I have two orders pending with this company. One placed 6/3/17 and the next placed 7/8/17. Both show "awaiting fulfillment ". When I emailed asking the status I got a reply stating they are behind and I can call and cancel the order if I wish. I want the supplies so I won't cancel YET!!   My credit card has been charged for both orders. I can assure you I will NOT order from this company again.   Even though their prices may be slightly lower than other companies waiting this long for delivery takes away the advantage of the lower prices. Over all I am EXTREMELY Disappointed.
Who is ready for this weeks You Tube....Good 'cause here it is! We are featuring Inky Antics HoneyPOP Collection of stamps and honeycomb paper along with Sizzix Movers and Shapers Dies by Tim Holtz and Stephanie Barnard! Sooooo much fun to create with all of these goodies! And...they are a You Tube Yummies...so they are ON SALE in the shop and online! 
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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