In addition to preserving memories, the hobby is popular for the strong social network that scrapbooking can provide.[13] Hobbyists, known as "scrappers" or "scrapbookers", get together and scrapbook at each other's homes, local scrapbook stores,[14] scrapbooking conventions, retreat centers, and even on cruises.[15] The term "crop", a reference to cropping or trimming printed photographs, was coined to describe these events.[16]
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.

Various accessories, referred to as "embellishments", are used to decorate scrapbook pages. Embellishments include stickers, rub-ons, stamps, eyelets, brads, chipboard elements in various shapes, alphabet letters, lace, wire, fabric, beads, sequins, and ribbon. The use of die cut machines is also increasingly popular; in recent years a number of electronic die-cutting machines resembling a plotter with a drag knife have hit the market (e.g. The Cricut), enabling scrappers to use their computer to create die cuts out of any shape or font with the use of free or third party software. Scrapbook makers will also use magazine clippings to "decorate" a scrapbook.

Our Designer Templates were designed to help you take advantage of that stack of paper that you’ve probably been hanging on to. They are a simple, back-to-basics tool for cutting universally appealing shapes out of your paper that will result in gorgeous scrapbook layouts in half the time! But that is only one small part of what this product can do for you! Let’s show you what we mean!
And for a chance to be a WINNER WINNER Chicken Dinner Peep here at Scrapbooking Made Simple...all you have to do is tell me the NEW Simply Defined product that you would want to WIN! You have three choices....Would you want to WIN Some of the NEW Simply Defined Dies, Simply Defined Stamps or Simply Defined Hot Foil Plates?? To see the entire collection, click the link to the You Tube SALE!!!
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
I got a little claustrophobic once when I went on a Saturday, (although my doctor called it an anxiety attack, when the same symptoms occured a couple years ago where I used to work!) so i avoid going on Saturdays.  I found out it was probably coupon day or the anniversary sale or something when I went, so oh well, no coupons for me.  Avoiding saturdays there from now on, might be a good idea for me.
The most important scrapbooking supply is the album itself, which can be permanently bound, or allow for the insertion of pages. There are other formats such as mini albums and accordion-style fold-out albums. Some of these are adhered to various containers, such as matchbooks, CD cases, or other small holders. When scrap artists started moving away from the "page" and onto alternative surfaces and objectives, they termed these creations "altered items" or now simply called "off-the-page". This movement circles back to the history of art from the 1960s when Louise Nevelson was doing "Assemblages" with found objects and recycled parts.
They have been updating their systems and hiring new employees, but in order to continue giving the deep discounts to their customers and still be profitable, they can't go hiring hundreds of employees to manage all their orders or spend tens of thousands on a better system.  They offer free shipping on most items with a $50 or more order.  There are a few items that weigh so much they cannot offer free shipping.  With each new change that has been implemented, there have been improvements on shipping times.  They are doing what they can and eventually they will find that formula that works best to reduce ship times to the best they possibly can.  It's all a matter of finding those solutions.  The owners of this store really want the best for their customers which is why they work so hard to get amazing products at amazing prices.
Organizing your tools and paper is half the battle in putting together the ultimate scrapbook. A storage system with lots of drawers will help keep a tidy workspace and work more efficiently. If you're an on-the-go scrapbooker, choose a scrapbook tote with several pockets for all of your art supplies. Totes are ideal for scrapbooking during vacations or getting together with friends for an afternoon of arts and crafts. 
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
×