Regardless of how many photos you use, keep in mind that the photos ought to go with the theme. Once you have successfully selected a suitable theme, work with the photos and do not be afraid to edit until you find the perfect match. Also keep in mind there really is no right or wrong when it comes to scrapbooking made easy, as you can simply do what feels right for you.

Waterproof and fade-proof pens for journaling will keep your scrapbook timeless. Pencils are handy for sketching out custom fonts or for marking borders when you may need to erase your work. Try adding your own comments or doodles with coloured pens ranging from fat to skinny tip. If you can’t decide which colour will match with your theme, a classic black ink pen is always a good choice. Handwritten notes detailing facts like dates, locations, and moods are an easy way to personalize your journal and make your entries more memorable and meaningful. 
Next, simply replace each template on your layout with the completed paper element. It is hard to describe the sense of satisfaction that comes as you watch your design spring to life before your eyes! And the best part is that it will look exactly like you thought it would every time, if not better! The end result will be an inexpensive, beautiful layout that will bring an added sense of creative fulfillment to your day!

Cardstock is the firm paper onto which you’ll glue your photos and embellishments. Typically, it's more flexible than paperboard, but stiffer than standard paper. You can find cardstock in a wide range of solid colours, patterns and textures, so it's easy to choose a look that matches your theme. Consider solid-colour cardstock if you plan on tearing pages for effect and don't want to expose an unattractive white core. Look for acid and lignin-free cardstock for decorated pages that will resist fading and discolouring over time.

The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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