A ruler is a must-have item in every scrapbooker's tool kit. You'll find yourself reaching for your ruler on a regular basis to center items on the page and to keep things balanced and well proportioned. This tool will also help you create straight borders when cutting accent paper or photos. As a safeguard, it's a good idea to check your cardstock size with your ruler before buying page protectors. 
Once you have finished working on the scrapbook page, place it in a sheet protector, then into the scrapbook album. For easier addition of pages, three ring binders are highly recommended. Feel free to make as many pages as will fit comfortably in your scrapbook and when you finish one, you may begin a whole new process with another scrapbook album.
This is a great book for scrapbookers. It has many ideas on scrapbook pages for people who have a lot of time and those who just have a little time. It also gives ideas on how to use color, handwriting and fonts, how to sort and store your stuff, and how to make digital pages. I found it very useful to get ideas and thought it was organized well and easy to use.

Includes 79 clear totes! 13 clear zipper velcro pouches. 3 wood drawers. 7 shelves with acrylic guards. 2 optional metal rods for ribbons, washi tape, or small punches. 6 large hooks. 3  storage pockets. Cutout for electrical cords. 12 caster wheels to allow unit to glide across (most*) flooring. Fold out table and additional storage underneath.        
A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10.  The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items.  I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs.
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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