I love this store.  The employees and the owner are friendly.  And they have the widest selection of product across many companies I have ever seen.  If they are out, they will order it for you.  Yes online orders do take a while, but you have to understand, they are a mom and pop store that gets so many orders, it is impossible for them to get the orders out as timely as many people would like.  Especially if you order during their super busy times of the year like Shop Hop, Sizzix warehouse sale, Spellbinders warehouse sale, and CHA.  If you need something sooner, go to the store and buy it.  If you can wait and don't need it any time soon, but want it, then place and order.

* We also recommend using our WorkBox on hardwood or tile flooring. If using on carpet, you may need to add a solid surface to allow WorkBox wheels to move freely. Opening and closing the WorkBox on carpet may cause added stress on the product. If you have vinyl flooring, check the manufacturing specs to see what it can tolerate as to weight. The WorkBox can be up to 1200 lbs with added craft supplies!
I go to SMS on a pretty regular basis because they have a great selection of product, some you might not see anywhere else. They also offer free make and takes, which are surely hard to come by these days especially with the amount of scrap-booking stores closing. Stacey and her staff are very helpful and very nice people. Yes, there are some difficulties with shipping certain items during certain times of the year, but that is because they truly are a Mom and Pop business. They don't have separate departments or a help line because they aren't Amazon, etc. They don't have items whisking by on conveyor belts being packed by hundreds of workers or robots, lol. I make a point to order the really good deals with no expectation of delivery dates (as Stacey says all the time, it ships when it ships), which I know can really put some people off. I look at it like this: "I may have to wait a while to get some items, but once I have it, I'm happy with my purchase and will many times have something that I couldn't get for the great price anywhere else". Also, I don't order something thinking that I will need it for a certain project trying to tell myself that it should be here in time. There are plenty of other things to purchase all over the internet for those projects! People who are complaining are probably not watching Stacey's YouTube videos, or are simply not understanding that "It ships when it ships" is the bottom line. They tell you truthfully , upfront so you have a chance to make the decision to purchase, so I feel it's very unfair to then get upset when your purchase doesn't arrive in a time frame that you decided would be acceptable in your own mind. So, after reading many reviews regarding the shipping....my advise would be just don't order if you have an issue with the shipping policy. There is always someone else out there (like me) who will gladly wait a bit longer knowing that I'm going to get a product that is extremely limited or exclusive to SMS for an exceptional price!! Stacey and her staff work very hard to bring truly exceptional and unique products to their customers, and offer imaginative ideas for using those products!! Patience is a virtue, but if you have none then oh well....your loss!! Just sayin.
One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]
Our Designer Templates were designed to help you take advantage of that stack of paper that you’ve probably been hanging on to. They are a simple, back-to-basics tool for cutting universally appealing shapes out of your paper that will result in gorgeous scrapbook layouts in half the time! But that is only one small part of what this product can do for you! Let’s show you what we mean!

A ruler is a must-have item in every scrapbooker's tool kit. You'll find yourself reaching for your ruler on a regular basis to center items on the page and to keep things balanced and well proportioned. This tool will also help you create straight borders when cutting accent paper or photos. As a safeguard, it's a good idea to check your cardstock size with your ruler before buying page protectors. 

The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks".[24]
And don’t worry about cutting a perfect line! A little bit of ink along the edge of each element will hide any blemishes as well as covering up any leftover pencil marks. We also recommend inking your edges as a way to take full advantage of the paper that you’ve chosen to use.Adding ink to each piece will separate the layers of your creation in a way that will highlight the patterns and colors in your paper and add a sense of depth to your layout. To see a demonstration of this step, as well as some tips on cutting, watch this quick video.
Old scrapbooks tended to have photos mounted with photomounting corners and perhaps notations of who was in a photo or where and when it was taken. They often included bits of memorabilia like newspaper clippings, letters, etc. An early known American scrapbooker and inventor of scrapbooking supplies was Mark Twain. Twain carried scrapbooks on his travels as he collected souvenirs, clippings and pictures.[8][9][10]
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