For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
Now, sadly, we do not ship 12 x 12 paper as we are just not good at it! We don't want you to have any bent corners :) So, we are stocking their 8 x 8 Paper Pads and all the lovely embellishments to go with! I have to give Graphic 45 and their wonderful staff a BIG SHOUT OUT as they have all... been so wahooo kachooo ahhhmazing! I think that they are as excited to be back at SMS as we are to have their newest lovelies that so make my heart happy!!
In addition to the collection of photographs, tickets, postcards, and other memorabilia, journaling is often a principal element in modern scrapbooks. Journaling is text that describes, explains, or accents the photographs on a scrapbook page. Contemporary journaling can take many forms. It can be reflective and story-like, take a reportive tone, or simply be a list of words. Journaling may also include song lyrics, quotations, and poems. The value of journaling lies in the fact that it provides an account of family histories that may otherwise not be preserved.

For example, for a page of black and white photos, an elegant paper is usually the most suitable paper print. After you have selected a themed paper, you can then go ahead and select a cardstock matt or a coordinating plain paper to frame or mat the photos. It’s important to note that if you have selected the double paged spread, then you can either decide to use two background papers that match or you can select two papers that coordinate.
Do not judge a book by it's cover is exactly what I thought when I pushed open the doors to this shop yesterday! It's in a pretty old strip mall with a ridiculous parking situation and tucked back in the corner, but what a very nice surprise indeed! Clean, well stocked with plenty of employees all asking if they can be of service makes for an enjoyable shopping experience.
The Scrapping Bug is firmly committed to our mission statement and will continue to strive to fulfill and indeed surpass these objectives in our efforts to earn your valued business. It is our ongoing commitment at The Scrapping Bug to assist you in your desire to expand your scrapbook skills, make available the latest and most up to date products in the industry and keep your purchase price the most competitive in the market place.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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