Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.
The Card Making Collection Kit from Tonic Studios is perfect for all crafters, from beginner to advance! You will receive easy-to-follow, step-by-step magazine guide which also includes 79 stunning designs that you can create using this kit. Everything from perfect paper folding to expert embossing, off-the-page DIY crafts, clever cards and elegant ideas using your kit. Regularly $70, today you can get this Kit for ONLY $19.99!
They curently do not charge your credit card until it is being packaged for shipping.  They don't hide anything.  "it ships when it ships."  They announce this all the time, especially when they are coming up to their busy times of year.  I can't imagine how many orders they get during her big event times of the year mentioned above.  Must be in the thousands.
Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 
All Ranger Ink supplies, including everything by Tim Holtz for Ranger, is on sale! Sale prices are already marked on the individual product pages. Whether you are looking for Ranger Ink stamping supplies, templates, embellishments and more, you can find the latest and greatest Ranger products in the Store and save BIG on them all. Shop now for the best selection!
There are SO many ways to make travel memories last a lifetime. Snap pictures during your time on the long airplane or car ride, save maps from your road-trip, or arrange the scraps from some of your favorite haunts to make vacation memory scrapbooking (ok, ok, and shadow-box displays) easy as pie. (Scientific reminder: any pie eaten while on vacation results in weight LOSS, not gain. It’s vacation science.). Read on for the perfect travel scrapbook inspiration.
Then, we add in the latest 12 colors of I... Zink Diamond Glitter by Aladine and you have a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER. Yep, this is the glitter that needs no glue and drys in a snap. Seriously, in most cases it dries in under a minute. No more leaving your projects to dry over night or worse yet....smudging them when you accidentally touch them!!!
Hello Hello Everyone! We have a great class for you today working with a stamp set that you might not know what to do with! It is the most perfect background stamp...ever! But, by just looking at it, it might be more than a bit confusing! So, today, we play! We play with all watercolor pencils. We play with several of these SMS Exclusive Stamp and Die Sets by Stampendous. And we play with an amazing and affordable backgrounds... stamp....ever!
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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