Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]

Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.
Some snacks and water are complementary... maybe I shouldn't have said that coz there might be some shameless people that would go and just grab the snacks without purchasing anything. But they are there for those scrapping. Hey, the longer you stay there, the more likely you are to buy more stuff. Yeah, I was only supposed to buy a couple of pages and cut a couple of things... I walked out with $40 worth of paper!
A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product.  She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address.  I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !!
Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks.
 A NEW manufacturer comes to Scrapbooking Made Simple today! Let's all welcome Studio Light and their incredibly affordable decoupage books. When I say "bang for your buck", I mean it when it comes to this products. It is all stunning. It is all easy to use. It allows you to keep things simple or BAM...take them up a notch! It really is a wonderful product for all types of crafters!
K&COMPANY-SMASH Blue Folio Bundle. This kit is a packed full of fun items and will help you get a jump on creating your first SMASH project. This package contains one 8x10 inch folio with photo sleeves, one SMASHstick pen and glue, one elastic pen band, seventy sticky notes, one list pad, one wallet folio, two paper clips, eight sticker strips, one roll of tape, one resealable decorative bag. Imported.

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.

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