During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.

Get ready to ohhhhhh and ahhhhhhh over the NEW collection of products from Studio Light! You bet your bottom dollar...they are HERE!!! And the price...seriously...the price is beyond holy smokes artichokes!!! I am so very excited to have these new goodies that pair up perfectly with the next NEW 12 colors of I Zink Diamond Glitter!!!! Studio Light is from the Netherlands and Aladine is from France, so it is an international whaoooo kachoooo You Tube this week!
Graphic 45’s recognizable flare is an all-time favorite at Scrapbook.com. For a limited time, save BIG on all of their flamboyant designs- from unforgettable stamps, paper pads, stickers, albums, and more. The discount is already taken from the regular price and reflected in the SALE price on each product page. This great discount expires soon, so shop NOW for big savings on Graphic 45 Products!
Doodles, photos, sketches, paintings, oh my! Journals are more free-form and try to capture the essence of the moment without being too precious about it. Perfectionists need not apply here. Let yourself relax (it’s ok to do this while on vacation AND when you return to real life) and let your mind and hand wander across your journal. You can create vintage looks with old magazines or glue, too.
Just watched the owner of this business berate the employees at a local restaurant for about ten minutes. All while wearing the sweatshirt bearing her company logo and repeatedly touting the fact that she was a local business owner. Good for her I guess? Super professional of her. So go here if you support that kind of behavior. Or you could just hit up the local craft stores instead.
Are you ready for a DEAL that is more like a STEAL? Wahooooo Kachoooo, Aussie Andrew has brought with him a DOORBUSTER DEAL that is going to make your heart very, very happy! You already know that the Contour Creations Go, Press and Foil machine is going to be ON SALE for $69.99...but wait...there's is MORE! For the next 10 minutes.....NO...just kidding...I couldn't help myself as those infomercials are just so hokey! But, it is TRUE that he has a deal for you. How about $56.00 worth of Go Press and Foil Plates for only $19.99 and these are a NEW RELEASE...most shops don't even have them yet :) This means that for about $90.00 you can get the Go, Press and Foil Machine and 4 Foil Plates to start your collection!!! The regular price for all of these goodies would be $176.00! For a chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep here at Scrapbooking Made Simple and receive both a Go, Press and Foil Machine AND the 4 Foil Plates that make up our DOORBUSTER DEAL, watch and post. The sale starts Saturday at 9 am sunny California time... Smiles, Stacey
Page trimmers allow you to cut paper cleanly and precisely. Use a page trimmer when you need to cut cardstock, patterned paper, or pictures to fit neatly into your album. You can save time by stacking multiple pages in your trimmer and cutting them simultaneously. For smaller cutting tasks, use a sturdy pair of scissors. Long-bladed scissors are helpful for quick cutting jobs that require flexibility, such as cutting out letters or tricky shapes. Scissors are also handy for cutting scrapbook embellishments like ribbons and stamps.
Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.
My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy: + Clean restroom, always clean. Yes, we notice these things. + Lots of goodies for customers. Who doesn't like candy? + Staff is always super nice and friendly! + Stacy, the owner, is probably one of the nicest, most sincere people I've ever met. + Most important: There is a "husband chair." Suggestions: * Wi-Fi. Husbands like Wi-Fi. (A PlayStation wouldn't hurt either...) Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.
For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
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