Who is ready for this weeks You Tube....Good 'cause here it is! We are featuring Inky Antics HoneyPOP Collection of stamps and honeycomb paper along with Sizzix Movers and Shapers Dies by Tim Holtz and Stephanie Barnard! Sooooo much fun to create with all of these goodies! And...they are a You Tube Yummies...so they are ON SALE in the shop and online! 
I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much.  Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!)  You see, I do cross stitch.  But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk.  And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many  cross stitch designs for cards, anymore.  So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined!
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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