And don’t worry about cutting a perfect line! A little bit of ink along the edge of each element will hide any blemishes as well as covering up any leftover pencil marks. We also recommend inking your edges as a way to take full advantage of the paper that you’ve chosen to use.Adding ink to each piece will separate the layers of your creation in a way that will highlight the patterns and colors in your paper and add a sense of depth to your layout. To see a demonstration of this step, as well as some tips on cutting, watch this quick video.
Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks.
Who is ready for this weeks You Tube....Good 'cause here it is! We are featuring Inky Antics HoneyPOP Collection of stamps and honeycomb paper along with Sizzix Movers and Shapers Dies by Tim Holtz and Stephanie Barnard! Sooooo much fun to create with all of these goodies! And...they are a You Tube Yummies...so they are ON SALE in the shop and online! 
Jump up ^ Strauss, Robert (2001-09-16). "Getting the Hang of Hanging Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-04. From 5 to 10 p.m. on those nights, at least a dozen women gather at the tables in the back room. For $5, the store buys them pizza and soda and they get use of the cutting materials and, of course, buy other stuff. You bring your photos and you get scrapbooking ideas.
I gave this 3 stars because I've got mixed opinions. One, i have two things on order since the 18th of September 2017. It is now going into week 4, and still haven't gotten the order. (Do they have favorite customers and tend to them first? Hmmmm.) When I emailed, I get a reply saying that they are behind on their orders and stuff like that. It's two Stamping Bella stamp sets and they don't carry this brand any where else, except of course the actual company. I am so used to my orders coming within days to, at most, a week or two, but this is way too long. I'm not too far away from the store, but they don't have these particular stamps in their store. :-/ Two, on the other side of the coin, I've also been in their store! How neat and clean it is! And the people there are oh so friendly, too. And this is the first store I've gone to that has the LAWN FAWN products! And they sell the stamps and dies as a bundle! Don't know if that is a good or bad thing, tho. I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much. Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!) You see, I do cross stitch. But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk. And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many cross stitch designs for cards, anymore. So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined! I got a little claustrophobic once when I went on a Saturday, (although my doctor called it an anxiety attack, when the same symptoms occured a couple years ago where I used to work!) so i avoid going on Saturdays. I found out it was probably coupon day or the anniversary sale or something when I went, so oh well, no coupons for me. Avoiding saturdays there from now on, might be a good idea for me. Also, also on a good note, I've seen a few of Stacey's videos and have learned some things. For instance, now i know the difference between a Sizzix Big Kick and a Sizzix Big Shot! And now i know why I don't see the Big Shot in Joann's or Michael's! (I hear more of the Big Shot than the Big Kick, so I wanted to find out the difference between them.) Anyway, thanks for what you do in the store. Wish your shipping could be a little better, though. Thats why the loss of two stars.
Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well. Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it. If you can't attend a free Saturday class, the owner, Stacy, has instructional videos on you tube.
All Ranger Ink supplies, including everything by Tim Holtz for Ranger, is on sale! Sale prices are already marked on the individual product pages. Whether you are looking for Ranger Ink stamping supplies, templates, embellishments and more, you can find the latest and greatest Ranger products in the Store and save BIG on them all. Shop now for the best selection!

In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.

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