Many consider journaling one of the most important elements of any scrapbook.[29] Journaling is a personal choice and it can describe the event, the photographs, or relate feelings and emotions. Handwritten journaling is considered best by some scrapbookers who see handwriting as valuable for posterity, but many people journal on the computer and print it onto a variety of surfaces including vellum, tape, ribbon, and paper.

Now, wha...t do we have for you today? Welp, how about a chance to be a WINNER WINNER and receive a wonderful prize package form SMS filled with the latest and greatest collection from Contour Creations? What do you have to post? Well, Aussie Andrew got the crazy idea to head on down to Florida to talk to a certain retailer about a Couture Creations - Scrapbooking Made Simple - Simply Defined Collaboration. For a chance to WIN, all you have to do is post what retailer YOU think he went to visit!!! And, just as an FYI, I am so not holding my breath about this! It might just be a bit outside MY comfort zone :)
A ruler is a must-have item in every scrapbooker's tool kit. You'll find yourself reaching for your ruler on a regular basis to center items on the page and to keep things balanced and well proportioned. This tool will also help you create straight borders when cutting accent paper or photos. As a safeguard, it's a good idea to check your cardstock size with your ruler before buying page protectors. 
Hello Everyone!!! Here it is...that Saturday with Stacey Class that gives you one place to learn MORE about the Go, Press and Foil machine by Couture Creations! In this "Do's and Don'ts" class we start with the basics of foiling but then we take it up a notch and we get wahoooo kachoooo with Cut 'n Foil Plates and then WOWZERS, we show you how to REALLY GET THE MOST our of your Go, Press and Foil Machine!!! So, hit the play button and lets get started!
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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