Who is ready for this weeks You Tube....Good 'cause here it is! We are featuring Inky Antics HoneyPOP Collection of stamps and honeycomb paper along with Sizzix Movers and Shapers Dies by Tim Holtz and Stephanie Barnard! Sooooo much fun to create with all of these goodies! And...they are a You Tube Yummies...so they are ON SALE in the shop and online! 
Anytime is a good time to finally get those scrapbooking ideas down on paper (or patterned paper!). It can be easy to have incredible experiences but no time to document all of those memories. Luckily, we have a slew of scrapbook ideas that will get your scrapbook design juices flowing. Whether you prefer digital designs or scrapbooking with a whole gang of scrapbook supplies rolling around the table, let these pages be a catalyst for assembling truly creative scrapbook spreads.
I have called monthly. Customer Service has been very polite but completely unable to do anything. They were "overwhelmed" with orders. They are currently processing orders from the first day of ordering-- but my order number is 200 higher than  the batch they are currently processing. Since it has taken three months to get this far, they understandably cannot predict when mine will be processed. (Sarcasm intended.)  
* We also recommend using our WorkBox on hardwood or tile flooring. If using on carpet, you may need to add a solid surface to allow WorkBox wheels to move freely. Opening and closing the WorkBox on carpet may cause added stress on the product. If you have vinyl flooring, check the manufacturing specs to see what it can tolerate as to weight. The WorkBox can be up to 1200 lbs with added craft supplies!
A ruler is a must-have item in every scrapbooker's tool kit. You'll find yourself reaching for your ruler on a regular basis to center items on the page and to keep things balanced and well proportioned. This tool will also help you create straight borders when cutting accent paper or photos. As a safeguard, it's a good idea to check your cardstock size with your ruler before buying page protectors. 
Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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