My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy: + Clean restroom, always clean. Yes, we notice these things. + Lots of goodies for customers. Who doesn't like candy? + Staff is always super nice and friendly! + Stacy, the owner, is probably one of the nicest, most sincere people I've ever met. + Most important: There is a "husband chair." Suggestions: * Wi-Fi. Husbands like Wi-Fi. (A PlayStation wouldn't hurt either...) Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.
Just watched the owner of this business berate the employees at a local restaurant for about ten minutes. All while wearing the sweatshirt bearing her company logo and repeatedly touting the fact that she was a local business owner. Good for her I guess? Super professional of her. So go here if you support that kind of behavior. Or you could just hit up the local craft stores instead.
Furthermore, digital scrapbooking is not limited to digital storage and display. Many digital scrappers print their finished layouts to be stored in scrapbook albums. Others have books professionally printed in hard bound books to be saved as keepsakes. Professional printing- and binding-services offer free software to create scrapbooks with professional layouts and individual layout capabilities. Because of the integrated design and order workflow, real hardcover bound books can be produced more cost effectively.
Now, sadly, we do not ship 12 x 12 paper as we are just not good at it! We don't want you to have any bent corners :) So, we are stocking their 8 x 8 Paper Pads and all the lovely embellishments to go with! I have to give Graphic 45 and their wonderful staff a BIG SHOUT OUT as they have all... been so wahooo kachooo ahhhmazing! I think that they are as excited to be back at SMS as we are to have their newest lovelies that so make my heart happy!!
Hello Everyone!!! Here it is...that Saturday with Stacey Class that gives you one place to learn MORE about the Go, Press and Foil machine by Couture Creations! In this "Do's and Don'ts" class we start with the basics of foiling but then we take it up a notch and we get wahoooo kachoooo with Cut 'n Foil Plates and then WOWZERS, we show you how to REALLY GET THE MOST our of your Go, Press and Foil Machine!!! So, hit the play button and lets get started!
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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