Whatever theme you've chosen for your scrapbook, you'll need a few essentials to get started. First, you'll need an album and its basic contents: cardstock, patterned paper and page protectors. Next, you need a selection of tools and supplies, including pencils, coloured markers, adhesives, a ruler and a page trimmer. Embellishments are an exciting part of scrapbooking. Your choice of ribbons, glitter or 3D stickers will inject your personality into your scrapbook and make the individual pages stand out. Staying organized is essential: a basic storage system will help keep your mind and workspace tidy so you can focus on being creative and having fun. 
One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]

OK, cancel my order. Oh no--they report they "cannot" cancel my order Computer quirk?. (No, this is being done manually. The orders were printed out and are kept in binders. The way you cancel it is to remove the order page from the binder!) Meanwhile, no apologies from the owner, no updates, no "sorry we screwed up by drastically underestimating demand and here's a coupon for you.."


Jump up ^ Sensational Page Ideas for Scrapbooks. Cincinnati, OH: Memory Makers. 2004. p. 31. ISBN 1-892127-49-0. Your hands should be clean and oil free when handling photographs and documents. Oil and dirt can rub off your fingers and onto the documents and photos causing damage and deterioration. Using a pair of inexpensive photography cotton gloves will help keep oily fingerprints from causing long-term damage.

And don’t worry about cutting a perfect line! A little bit of ink along the edge of each element will hide any blemishes as well as covering up any leftover pencil marks. We also recommend inking your edges as a way to take full advantage of the paper that you’ve chosen to use.Adding ink to each piece will separate the layers of your creation in a way that will highlight the patterns and colors in your paper and add a sense of depth to your layout. To see a demonstration of this step, as well as some tips on cutting, watch this quick video.
Now, there is a story that goes with this collection and why I name it what I did! It has to do with my dad and what I didn't understand as a child, but the older and wiser Stacey now does! I have a few fun ...techniques for you that really help to show off how useful these dies, stamps and hot foil plates can be! And, if you need guy cards or you love animals, I think this collection is just for you!
Also, also on a good note, I've seen a few of Stacey's videos and have learned some things.  For instance, now i know the difference between a Sizzix Big Kick and a Sizzix Big Shot!  And now i know why I don't see the Big Shot in Joann's or Michael's!  (I hear more of the Big Shot than the Big Kick, so I wanted to find out the difference between them.)
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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