Page trimmers allow you to cut paper cleanly and precisely. Use a page trimmer when you need to cut cardstock, patterned paper, or pictures to fit neatly into your album. You can save time by stacking multiple pages in your trimmer and cutting them simultaneously. For smaller cutting tasks, use a sturdy pair of scissors. Long-bladed scissors are helpful for quick cutting jobs that require flexibility, such as cutting out letters or tricky shapes. Scissors are also handy for cutting scrapbook embellishments like ribbons and stamps.
An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.
Various accessories, referred to as "embellishments", are used to decorate scrapbook pages. Embellishments include stickers, rub-ons, stamps, eyelets, brads, chipboard elements in various shapes, alphabet letters, lace, wire, fabric, beads, sequins, and ribbon. The use of die cut machines is also increasingly popular; in recent years a number of electronic die-cutting machines resembling a plotter with a drag knife have hit the market (e.g. The Cricut), enabling scrappers to use their computer to create die cuts out of any shape or font with the use of free or third party software. Scrapbook makers will also use magazine clippings to "decorate" a scrapbook.
For anyone still a little intimidated by the scrapbooking craze, Scrapbooking Made Easy is the best place to start. At its core is the notion that even the simplest pages will make for treausred family heirlooms. From that, it's only a matter of applying the basic techniques in a step-by-step process, starting with quick ways to enhance layouts, and gradually moving on to ...more

For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
×