During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.

I purchased the Beloved Kaleidoscope die collection and absolutely love them.  It took over a month to receive, but well worth the wait!   I called to check on my order by phone and was helped by Claire.  Claire was wonderful and fun to chat with.  Thank you to Stacey for the wonderful Youtube demos, and I will be shopping with you again soon.....hoping to be able to visit the store if I can get hubby to drive me to SoCal.
Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 
An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.
OK SMS Peep's....I am in a "It's Gotta Go" kinda mood as we have been cleaning out used dies, stamps, embossing folders, displays and other crafting tools in the shop that have to GO! So, the SMS Staff has been filling up boxes of yummy crafty stuff to take home with them....It was mandatory! If they wanted their paycheck they also had to take some of this left over stuff home for free!!! Boxes and boxes and boxes were filled up and on their way to their new homes to be loved and enjoyed! But....guess what else I found? Hummmmmmmmm...I think you will be thrilled that I was in an "It's Gotta Go" mood! It seems that I have a Sizzix Big Shot Machine and a Spellbinders Platinum 6 Machine that are BRAND NEW and screaming to be given away!!! Can you say, "Wahoooooo Kachoooo!" Funny thing it, we are bringing BOTH machines back to our online store as part of this week's Saturday with Stacey You Tube Yummies Sale, so this is the PERFECT TIME to give one of each away!!! Now, for a chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER PEEP here at SMS, what do you have to post for a chance to WIN one of these machines? So easy-peasy...just tell me the machine that YOU want to WIN! Now, these are REALLY BIG PRIZES as both machines retail for $119.00 each, so here is the catch. You must pick only ONE MACHINE to win...ya can't say that you would be happy with either. And...you can only post ONCE. We need to be fair to everyone. Smiles, Stacey #scrapbookingmadesimple

The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]
I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much.  Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!)  You see, I do cross stitch.  But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk.  And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many  cross stitch designs for cards, anymore.  So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined!
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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