Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.
An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.
However, I placed an order in July on the first day of a big sale....and I am still waiting for it THREE months later.  I realize the advertising for the sale said that their usual shipping times would not apply during the sale, but three months without specific notice that it would be that long is simply unacceptable. I was waiting for certain items to make merchandise for Fall draft fairs. Well, forget that-- I have had to go out and buy what I needed. (These are all dies that don't get used up. Maybe I will get my money back if I sell t hem on Ebay-- someday.)
I love this store. The employees and the owner are friendly. And they have the widest selection of product across many companies I have ever seen. If they are out, they will order it for you. Yes online orders do take a while, but you have to understand, they are a mom and pop store that gets so many orders, it is impossible for them to get the orders out as timely as many people would like. Especially if you order during their super busy times of the year like Shop Hop, Sizzix warehouse sale, Spellbinders warehouse sale, and CHA. If you need something sooner, go to the store and buy it. If you can wait and don't need it any time soon, but want it, then place and order. They curently do not charge your credit card until it is being packaged for shipping. They don't hide anything. "it ships when it ships." They announce this all the time, especially when they are coming up to their busy times of year. I can't imagine how many orders they get during her big event times of the year mentioned above. Must be in the thousands. With their new site, customers now have the option to pay with paypal when it comes time for your order to be packaged. If you need something now and can't get to the store, order it elsewhere. I hate to send business away from such a great store and such wonderful people, but it is what it is. I only order online what I don't need right away, can't get to the store, and/or when I want to take advantage of the amazing deals they have that you can't get anywhere else. They also carry product you can't get anywhere else at times. I am fortunate enough to be close enough to make the trip to her store when I need to most of the time. They have been updating their systems and hiring new employees, but in order to continue giving the deep discounts to their customers and still be profitable, they can't go hiring hundreds of employees to manage all their orders or spend tens of thousands on a better system. They offer free shipping on most items with a $50 or more order. There are a few items that weigh so much they cannot offer free shipping. With each new change that has been implemented, there have been improvements on shipping times. They are doing what they can and eventually they will find that formula that works best to reduce ship times to the best they possibly can. It's all a matter of finding those solutions. The owners of this store really want the best for their customers which is why they work so hard to get amazing products at amazing prices.

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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