Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
Once you have finished working on the scrapbook page, place it in a sheet protector, then into the scrapbook album. For easier addition of pages, three ring binders are highly recommended. Feel free to make as many pages as will fit comfortably in your scrapbook and when you finish one, you may begin a whole new process with another scrapbook album.

First and foremost, begin the process by selecting photos on the theme, idea, or event you’ve decided to work on. Perhaps you want to showcase a certain vacation or your child’s first birthday celebration. Or maybe you want to create a scrapbook for a friend or family member. During the creation process, plan on using your photos as a narration of the theme.


I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much.  Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!)  You see, I do cross stitch.  But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk.  And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many  cross stitch designs for cards, anymore.  So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined!
A ruler is a must-have item in every scrapbooker's tool kit. You'll find yourself reaching for your ruler on a regular basis to center items on the page and to keep things balanced and well proportioned. This tool will also help you create straight borders when cutting accent paper or photos. As a safeguard, it's a good idea to check your cardstock size with your ruler before buying page protectors. 
Patterned paper enhances your scrapbooking by effortlessly adding colour, energy, and emotion. You can establish any theme you want for a page by simply gluing your choice of patterned paper on top of your cardstock. Patterned paper is generally sold in packs containing a variety of design options. You can use this paper to create an attractive border for a page or page element like a picture, or use it to cover an entire page.
Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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