People who are complaining are probably not watching Stacey's YouTube videos, or are simply not understanding that "It ships when it ships" is the bottom line. They tell you truthfully , upfront so you have a chance to make the decision to purchase, so I feel it's very unfair to then get upset when your purchase doesn't arrive in a time frame that you decided would be acceptable in your own mind.
I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much.  Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!)  You see, I do cross stitch.  But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk.  And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many  cross stitch designs for cards, anymore.  So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined!
One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]
After you have glued the photo to the matting paper, then cut the other two sides so that you end up with a frame around the photos. An ideal mat will provide a visual space between the paper and the photo, regardless as to whether you’re using a solid color or not. When selecting the color of the mat, you should first consider the dominant color together with the minor colors in the background.
And don’t worry about cutting a perfect line! A little bit of ink along the edge of each element will hide any blemishes as well as covering up any leftover pencil marks. We also recommend inking your edges as a way to take full advantage of the paper that you’ve chosen to use.Adding ink to each piece will separate the layers of your creation in a way that will highlight the patterns and colors in your paper and add a sense of depth to your layout. To see a demonstration of this step, as well as some tips on cutting, watch this quick video.
And don’t worry about cutting a perfect line! A little bit of ink along the edge of each element will hide any blemishes as well as covering up any leftover pencil marks. We also recommend inking your edges as a way to take full advantage of the paper that you’ve chosen to use.Adding ink to each piece will separate the layers of your creation in a way that will highlight the patterns and colors in your paper and add a sense of depth to your layout. To see a demonstration of this step, as well as some tips on cutting, watch this quick video.

People who are complaining are probably not watching Stacey's YouTube videos, or are simply not understanding that "It ships when it ships" is the bottom line. They tell you truthfully , upfront so you have a chance to make the decision to purchase, so I feel it's very unfair to then get upset when your purchase doesn't arrive in a time frame that you decided would be acceptable in your own mind.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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