One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]
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Below are ...just a few of the samples that will be shown in this week's Saturday With Stacey You Tube Class #269! And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep what do you have to post? Well, both Studio Light B.V and Aladine are international companies and need some well wishes from their friends across the pond (that would be YOU!) Click their name that is BLUE in this post to visit their site and somewhere....anywhere you can find...post that Scrapbooking Made Simple Peep's LOVE, LOVE, LOVE their products! Then, come back here and tell me that you posted on one or both!
Scrapbooking is a method of preserving, presenting, arranging personal and family history in the form of a book, box, card. Typical memorabilia include photographs, printed media, and artwork. Scrapbook albums are often decorated and frequently contain extensive journaling. Scrapbooking started in the United Kingdom in the nineteenth century, but is now primarily a United States phenomenon.
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