Cardstock is the firm paper onto which you’ll glue your photos and embellishments. Typically, it's more flexible than paperboard, but stiffer than standard paper. You can find cardstock in a wide range of solid colours, patterns and textures, so it's easy to choose a look that matches your theme. Consider solid-colour cardstock if you plan on tearing pages for effect and don't want to expose an unattractive white core. Look for acid and lignin-free cardstock for decorated pages that will resist fading and discolouring over time.

The Card Making Collection Kit from Tonic Studios is perfect for all crafters, from beginner to advance! You will receive easy-to-follow, step-by-step magazine guide which also includes 79 stunning designs that you can create using this kit. Everything from perfect paper folding to expert embossing, off-the-page DIY crafts, clever cards and elegant ideas using your kit. Regularly $70, today you can get this Kit for ONLY $19.99!
After you have glued the photo to the matting paper, then cut the other two sides so that you end up with a frame around the photos. An ideal mat will provide a visual space between the paper and the photo, regardless as to whether you’re using a solid color or not. When selecting the color of the mat, you should first consider the dominant color together with the minor colors in the background.
You might not know this, but the Anita's brand of products is part of the DoCrafts family! Their Foiled Decoupage is some of the very best that you can find! It is both stunning and affordable all at the same times! Each of the sheets below will let you make not 1, not 2 but 3 wonderful embellishments... for your cards, layouts, tags, gift bags...heck....just about everything! And, the very best part is that they are only $1.50 per sheet...Yep...even with all that yummy foiling they have added!
Welcome to Paper Wishes® Scrapbooking 101 – your guide to the basics of scrapbooking! Whether you are brand new to scrapbooking, or are just looking to master the basics, Scrapbooking 101 has all the information you need to get started creating your own scrapbook pages and albums! Scrapbooking 101 provides information about commonly used scrapbooking supplies, including adhesives and paper cutting tools. Scrapbooking 101 also has articles covering scrapbooking ideas and layouts, including general tips on how to use and combine your scrapbooking papers! When you are ready to move beyond the basics, delve into our Scrapbooking Articles section to learn convenient shortcuts and new techniques that will enhance your scrapbook pages, such as embellishments, stamping and journaling. Also be sure to try some of the great scrapbooking ideas found in our Project of the Month section. The scrapbook albums you create will be treasured keepsakes for years to come!

In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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