Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.
Jump up ^ Strauss, Robert (2001-09-16). "Getting the Hang of Hanging Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-04. From 5 to 10 p.m. on those nights, at least a dozen women gather at the tables in the back room. For $5, the store buys them pizza and soda and they get use of the cutting materials and, of course, buy other stuff. You bring your photos and you get scrapbooking ideas.
Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.
* We also recommend using our WorkBox on hardwood or tile flooring. If using on carpet, you may need to add a solid surface to allow WorkBox wheels to move freely. Opening and closing the WorkBox on carpet may cause added stress on the product. If you have vinyl flooring, check the manufacturing specs to see what it can tolerate as to weight. The WorkBox can be up to 1200 lbs with added craft supplies!
Shop the largest papercrafting shop in the world and get everything you need for your handmade craft projects in one easy-to-use place. You'll find a wide selection of scrapbook paper, albums, die cutting machines and dies, stamps, inks and much more. Scrapbook.com offers a 60-day money-back guarantee and 5-star customer service so you can shop with confidence.
Then, we add in the latest 12 colors of I... Zink Diamond Glitter by Aladine and you have a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER. Yep, this is the glitter that needs no glue and drys in a snap. Seriously, in most cases it dries in under a minute. No more leaving your projects to dry over night or worse yet....smudging them when you accidentally touch them!!!
Whatever theme you've chosen for your scrapbook, you'll need a few essentials to get started. First, you'll need an album and its basic contents: cardstock, patterned paper and page protectors. Next, you need a selection of tools and supplies, including pencils, coloured markers, adhesives, a ruler and a page trimmer. Embellishments are an exciting part of scrapbooking. Your choice of ribbons, glitter or 3D stickers will inject your personality into your scrapbook and make the individual pages stand out. Staying organized is essential: a basic storage system will help keep your mind and workspace tidy so you can focus on being creative and having fun. 
Digital scrapbooking has advanced to the point where digital scrapbook layouts may be made entirely online using Web-based software. Users upload their photos, create a digital scrapbook layout using a Web page and digital scrapbook graphics. The layout can then be downloaded as a low-resolution JPEG file for sharing on the Web or as a high-resolution JPEG file for printing.

Jump up ^ Strauss, Robert (2001-09-16). "Getting the Hang of Hanging Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-04. From 5 to 10 p.m. on those nights, at least a dozen women gather at the tables in the back room. For $5, the store buys them pizza and soda and they get use of the cutting materials and, of course, buy other stuff. You bring your photos and you get scrapbooking ideas.


In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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