The following photographs show some of the pages from a "Memorial of Friendship" scrapbook kept by Anne Wagner, a British woman, between 1795 and 1834. She belonged to the same social circle as the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Anne Wagner's scrapbook includes pages she created, as well as contributions from friends and relatives. The scrapbook contains handwritten poems, notes left by friends and relatives, and decoupage ephemera like locks of hair, decorative paper clippings, ribbons, and detailed watercolour sketches.
Welcome to Paper Wishes® Scrapbooking 101 – your guide to the basics of scrapbooking! Whether you are brand new to scrapbooking, or are just looking to master the basics, Scrapbooking 101 has all the information you need to get started creating your own scrapbook pages and albums! Scrapbooking 101 provides information about commonly used scrapbooking supplies, including adhesives and paper cutting tools. Scrapbooking 101 also has articles covering scrapbooking ideas and layouts, including general tips on how to use and combine your scrapbooking papers! When you are ready to move beyond the basics, delve into our Scrapbooking Articles section to learn convenient shortcuts and new techniques that will enhance your scrapbook pages, such as embellishments, stamping and journaling. Also be sure to try some of the great scrapbooking ideas found in our Project of the Month section. The scrapbook albums you create will be treasured keepsakes for years to come!
One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]
 Hmmmm.)   When I emailed, I get a reply saying that they are behind on their orders and stuff like that.  It's two Stamping Bella stamp sets and they don't carry this brand any where else, except of course the actual company.  I am so used to my orders coming within days to, at most, a week or two, but this is way too long.  I'm not too far away from the store, but they don't have these particular stamps in their store.  :-/

Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks.

Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
And for a chance to be a WINNER WINNER Chicken Dinner Peep here at Scrapbooking Made Simple...all you have to do is tell me the NEW Simply Defined product that you would want to WIN! You have three choices....Would you want to WIN Some of the NEW Simply Defined Dies, Simply Defined Stamps or Simply Defined Hot Foil Plates?? To see the entire collection, click the link to the You Tube SALE!!!
The most important scrapbooking supply is the album itself, which can be permanently bound, or allow for the insertion of pages. There are other formats such as mini albums and accordion-style fold-out albums. Some of these are adhered to various containers, such as matchbooks, CD cases, or other small holders. When scrap artists started moving away from the "page" and onto alternative surfaces and objectives, they termed these creations "altered items" or now simply called "off-the-page". This movement circles back to the history of art from the 1960s when Louise Nevelson was doing "Assemblages" with found objects and recycled parts.
A ruler is a must-have item in every scrapbooker's tool kit. You'll find yourself reaching for your ruler on a regular basis to center items on the page and to keep things balanced and well proportioned. This tool will also help you create straight borders when cutting accent paper or photos. As a safeguard, it's a good idea to check your cardstock size with your ruler before buying page protectors. 
Also, also on a good note, I've seen a few of Stacey's videos and have learned some things.  For instance, now i know the difference between a Sizzix Big Kick and a Sizzix Big Shot!  And now i know why I don't see the Big Shot in Joann's or Michael's!  (I hear more of the Big Shot than the Big Kick, so I wanted to find out the difference between them.)
Now, there is a story that goes with this collection and why I name it what I did! It has to do with my dad and what I didn't understand as a child, but the older and wiser Stacey now does! I have a few fun ...techniques for you that really help to show off how useful these dies, stamps and hot foil plates can be! And, if you need guy cards or you love animals, I think this collection is just for you!

In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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