The first step in the Play-to-Create system is to design our layout. Coming up with a design idea that you can be confident about can be the hardest step in the scrapbooking process. Too often we will stare at our materials for hours, trying to will an idea into existence, or we will surf endlessly on the internet trying to find some inspiration. We may resort to sketching something out on a piece of paper, but the end result is never quite what we imagined it would be.

For example, for a page of black and white photos, an elegant paper is usually the most suitable paper print. After you have selected a themed paper, you can then go ahead and select a cardstock matt or a coordinating plain paper to frame or mat the photos. It’s important to note that if you have selected the double paged spread, then you can either decide to use two background papers that match or you can select two papers that coordinate.
Take free video classes from top teachers and designers. Learn how to make beautiful cards, meaningful scrapbook layouts, and other handmade projects. Explore everything from beginning stamping to advanced die cutting and everything else you can imagine. Other sites charge $20 to $40 for similar classes, but Scrapbook.com offers these lessons at no cost.
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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