I got a little claustrophobic once when I went on a Saturday, (although my doctor called it an anxiety attack, when the same symptoms occured a couple years ago where I used to work!) so i avoid going on Saturdays.  I found out it was probably coupon day or the anniversary sale or something when I went, so oh well, no coupons for me.  Avoiding saturdays there from now on, might be a good idea for me.
2.5 stars. Generally, the examples are way too busy for my tastes (I think they are trying to sell more products.) Good basic ideas and layouts for beginners. Offers lots of encouragement. Covers everything from fonts to cropping to creating your work space to embellishments to album ideas. As a long time scrapbooker, I found it was NOT made easy, simply because there was so much in it.
Yes lots of product but don't be in a hurry for orders. I received order today of order placed ONE YEAR AGO on July 18, 2016. And it wasn't complete because one item had been "discontinued". I don't believe it for a minute. If been asking and asking and was told it ships when it ships. I asked again on 17th and low and behold they found only part of my order in the sinkhole of orders. Might have lots of good product but if going to have sales be sure to have staff to ship orders before you start yet ANOTHER sale.
Hi there! I am Stacey, owner of Scrapbooking Made Simple, a retail and online store! Every Saturday, we bring you a You Tube Class Called "Saturday's With Stacey"! These classes are all about using what you may already own, showing you new products all while keeping this great hobby affordable! So, please subscribe to our channel and welcome to Scrapbooking Made Simple!

Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
Next, simply replace each template on your layout with the completed paper element. It is hard to describe the sense of satisfaction that comes as you watch your design spring to life before your eyes! And the best part is that it will look exactly like you thought it would every time, if not better! The end result will be an inexpensive, beautiful layout that will bring an added sense of creative fulfillment to your day!

For anyone still a little intimidated by the scrapbooking craze, Scrapbooking Made Easy is the best place to start. At its core is the notion that even the simplest pages will make for treausred family heirlooms. From that, it's only a matter of applying the basic techniques in a step-by-step process, starting with quick ways to enhance layouts, and gradually moving on to ...more
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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