The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]
Plenty of free parking with no time limits because they have their own parking lot. This shop is in a center with 4 different food establishments. YES! If you're a scrapbooker, you know why that's important. And the no time limit parking. As soon as you enter, you'll see two work tables. I thought this was it... but then we ventured to the back and oh boy! That is a HUGE work area. Love it! Larger than any of the scrapbooking places I've been to in Orange County. I used to frequent 3 different ones. Some snacks and water are complementary... maybe I shouldn't have said that coz there might be some shameless people that would go and just grab the snacks without purchasing anything. But they are there for those scrapping. Hey, the longer you stay there, the more likely you are to buy more stuff. Yeah, I was only supposed to buy a couple of pages and cut a couple of things... I walked out with $40 worth of paper! The papers are kinda expensive, which is normal... but they don't have a sales rack, which I haven't seen before. The ladies are extremely helpful. I WILL BE BACK! THIS WEEK IF I CAN!!!
People who are complaining are probably not watching Stacey's YouTube videos, or are simply not understanding that "It ships when it ships" is the bottom line. They tell you truthfully , upfront so you have a chance to make the decision to purchase, so I feel it's very unfair to then get upset when your purchase doesn't arrive in a time frame that you decided would be acceptable in your own mind.
I have called monthly. Customer Service has been very polite but completely unable to do anything. They were "overwhelmed" with orders. They are currently processing orders from the first day of ordering-- but my order number is 200 higher than  the batch they are currently processing. Since it has taken three months to get this far, they understandably cannot predict when mine will be processed. (Sarcasm intended.)  
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
×