Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 

Regardless of how many photos you use, keep in mind that the photos ought to go with the theme. Once you have successfully selected a suitable theme, work with the photos and do not be afraid to edit until you find the perfect match. Also keep in mind there really is no right or wrong when it comes to scrapbooking made easy, as you can simply do what feels right for you.
Page protectors help keep your decorated pages safe from harm, including the damage caused oily fingers, pages sticking together and general wear and tear. Choose between glossy or non-glare protectors, depending on your preference. Even if your cardstock is acid and lignin-free, you should still use non-vinyl and archival-safe page protectors to prevent damage and potential fading. Be sure to buy page protectors that match the size of your album. 
Once you’ve successfully picked the photos, the next step involves selecting a patterned paper for your background, which will not only add color to the page, but also depth. By using patterned paper, you’ll be able to mirror the story that you are trying to tell with photos. Depending on the theme, look, and style, you may be able to find themed papers that will suit your every need. All in all, when selecting the patterned paper, you should select a pattern that enhances your theme.
Scrapbookers will sometimes refer to sketches for inspiration for their pages.[citation needed] Sketches are a hand-drawn layout showing where to position photos, titles, journaling and embellishments. It gives novice scrapbookers somewhere to begin if they are not experienced with balancing the layout correctly. Scrapbookers can interpret the sketch in any way they choose; it is a great starting point when you have scrappers-block. There have been many sketchbooks published and scrapbooking magazines always offer sketches as part of their content.[original research?]
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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