A scrapbooking, card makers and crafters dream. We do day, weekend and weekday crops and retreats. Our studio is set up for scrapbooking, card making and all kinds of crafting, as well as classes and crops. The studio has amazing natural light, plus we have installed LED lights above work stations, and have even added Ott Lites to each work station.  Each station also comes with a self healing magnetic mat and a basket with some essential tool. The studio is setup with all the latest tools and toys to play with. The building has WIFI for your use will you visit as well.
The Scrapping Bug is firmly committed to our mission statement and will continue to strive to fulfill and indeed surpass these objectives in our efforts to earn your valued business. It is our ongoing commitment at The Scrapping Bug to assist you in your desire to expand your scrapbook skills, make available the latest and most up to date products in the industry and keep your purchase price the most competitive in the market place.
However, I placed an order in July on the first day of a big sale....and I am still waiting for it THREE months later.  I realize the advertising for the sale said that their usual shipping times would not apply during the sale, but three months without specific notice that it would be that long is simply unacceptable. I was waiting for certain items to make merchandise for Fall draft fairs. Well, forget that-- I have had to go out and buy what I needed. (These are all dies that don't get used up. Maybe I will get my money back if I sell t hem on Ebay-- someday.)
Your heart will flutter like these lovely butterflies if you are a WINNER WINNER Chicken Dinner Peep here at SMS!!! Lookie at what has just arrived and is ON SALE both in our retail shop and online store! New from Northwoods Stamps are 5 ahhhhhmazing cling rubber sets and they are gorgeous! I was so very excited when Northwoods Stamps decided to cling mount rubber stamps in addition to their wood mount stamps! The cling mount is so much easier for storage and they ever cost a bit less than wood mount! So, here is your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep here at SMS! What do you have to post? How you tell me a time that you remember seeing a lovely butterfly! Was it in your garden when you sent out to water the tomato plants? Maybe it was at church during the annual Easter Egg Hunt? Or, it could even have been at a wedding where all that attended were given a butterfly to let go of in celebration of the newly married couple. You tell me a lovely memory and some of you will find that SMS Happy Mail will be on its way to you!! Smiles, Stacey
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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