Below are ...just a few of the samples that will be shown in this week's Saturday With Stacey You Tube Class #269! And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep what do you have to post? Well, both Studio Light B.V and Aladine are international companies and need some well wishes from their friends across the pond (that would be YOU!) Click their name that is BLUE in this post to visit their site and somewhere....anywhere you can find...post that Scrapbooking Made Simple Peep's LOVE, LOVE, LOVE their products! Then, come back here and tell me that you posted on one or both!
Gather up the storage bins from around the house - there’s room for it all in this beautiful, patented cabinet! With everything in sight and within reach, exploring your creativity has never been easier (or more fun!). The WorkBox 3.0 is our most popular furniture piece, offering an amazing hideaway workspace for any type of crafter.  Currently your order will ship in 2-6 weeks.
Get ready to ohhhhhh and ahhhhhhh over the NEW collection of products from Studio Light! You bet your bottom dollar...they are HERE!!! And the price...seriously...the price is beyond holy smokes artichokes!!! I am so very excited to have these new goodies that pair up perfectly with the next NEW 12 colors of I Zink Diamond Glitter!!!! Studio Light is from the Netherlands and Aladine is from France, so it is an international whaoooo kachoooo You Tube this week!
My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy:
Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.
Cardstock is the firm paper onto which you’ll glue your photos and embellishments. Typically, it's more flexible than paperboard, but stiffer than standard paper. You can find cardstock in a wide range of solid colours, patterns and textures, so it's easy to choose a look that matches your theme. Consider solid-colour cardstock if you plan on tearing pages for effect and don't want to expose an unattractive white core. Look for acid and lignin-free cardstock for decorated pages that will resist fading and discolouring over time.

Doodles, photos, sketches, paintings, oh my! Journals are more free-form and try to capture the essence of the moment without being too precious about it. Perfectionists need not apply here. Let yourself relax (it’s ok to do this while on vacation AND when you return to real life) and let your mind and hand wander across your journal. You can create vintage looks with old magazines or glue, too.
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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