This is a really cute store with everything you need for cards and scrapbooking. I came here for their "garage sale" and bought wonderful things for unbelievable prices. Their normal items are at reasonable also. BUT...if you order anything online it takes a very long to receive, regardless of "shop that didn't hop" sales. I've been waiting 10 weeks and they still cannot give me a delivery time of my products, some items are in stock but will be delivered with the "close out" items. Very disappointing.

Below are ...just a few of the samples that will be shown in this week's Saturday With Stacey You Tube Class #269! And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep what do you have to post? Well, both Studio Light B.V and Aladine are international companies and need some well wishes from their friends across the pond (that would be YOU!) Click their name that is BLUE in this post to visit their site and somewhere....anywhere you can find...post that Scrapbooking Made Simple Peep's LOVE, LOVE, LOVE their products! Then, come back here and tell me that you posted on one or both!

Page trimmers allow you to cut paper cleanly and precisely. Use a page trimmer when you need to cut cardstock, patterned paper, or pictures to fit neatly into your album. You can save time by stacking multiple pages in your trimmer and cutting them simultaneously. For smaller cutting tasks, use a sturdy pair of scissors. Long-bladed scissors are helpful for quick cutting jobs that require flexibility, such as cutting out letters or tricky shapes. Scissors are also handy for cutting scrapbook embellishments like ribbons and stamps.
In addition to preserving memories, the hobby is popular for the strong social network that scrapbooking can provide.[13] Hobbyists, known as "scrappers" or "scrapbookers", get together and scrapbook at each other's homes, local scrapbook stores,[14] scrapbooking conventions, retreat centers, and even on cruises.[15] The term "crop", a reference to cropping or trimming printed photographs, was coined to describe these events.[16]
Furthermore, digital scrapbooking is not limited to digital storage and display. Many digital scrappers print their finished layouts to be stored in scrapbook albums. Others have books professionally printed in hard bound books to be saved as keepsakes. Professional printing- and binding-services offer free software to create scrapbooks with professional layouts and individual layout capabilities. Because of the integrated design and order workflow, real hardcover bound books can be produced more cost effectively.
Hello Hello Everyone! We have a great class for you today working with a stamp set that you might not know what to do with! It is the most perfect background stamp...ever! But, by just looking at it, it might be more than a bit confusing! So, today, we play! We play with all watercolor pencils. We play with several of these SMS Exclusive Stamp and Die Sets by Stampendous. And we play with an amazing and affordable backgrounds... stamp....ever!
Organizing your tools and paper is half the battle in putting together the ultimate scrapbook. A storage system with lots of drawers will help keep a tidy workspace and work more efficiently. If you're an on-the-go scrapbooker, choose a scrapbook tote with several pockets for all of your art supplies. Totes are ideal for scrapbooking during vacations or getting together with friends for an afternoon of arts and crafts. 
One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]

Includes 79 clear totes! 13 clear zipper velcro pouches. 3 wood drawers. 7 shelves with acrylic guards. 2 optional metal rods for ribbons, washi tape, or small punches. 6 large hooks. 3  storage pockets. Cutout for electrical cords. 12 caster wheels to allow unit to glide across (most*) flooring. Fold out table and additional storage underneath.        
First and foremost, begin the process by selecting photos on the theme, idea, or event you’ve decided to work on. Perhaps you want to showcase a certain vacation or your child’s first birthday celebration. Or maybe you want to create a scrapbook for a friend or family member. During the creation process, plan on using your photos as a narration of the theme.
Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 
I make a point to order the really good deals with no expectation of delivery dates (as Stacey says all the time, it ships when it ships), which I know can really put some people off. I look at it like this: "I may have to wait a while to get some items, but once I have it, I'm happy with my purchase and will many times have something that I couldn't get for the great price anywhere else". Also, I don't order something thinking that I will need it for a certain project trying to tell myself that it should be here in time. There are plenty of other things to purchase all over the internet for those projects!

In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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