Once you have finished working on the scrapbook page, place it in a sheet protector, then into the scrapbook album. For easier addition of pages, three ring binders are highly recommended. Feel free to make as many pages as will fit comfortably in your scrapbook and when you finish one, you may begin a whole new process with another scrapbook album.
Then, we add in the latest 12 colors of I... Zink Diamond Glitter by Aladine and you have a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER. Yep, this is the glitter that needs no glue and drys in a snap. Seriously, in most cases it dries in under a minute. No more leaving your projects to dry over night or worse yet....smudging them when you accidentally touch them!!!
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.
Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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